Cdc.gov

Risk Factors and Cancer CDC

Smoking tobacco products causes almost nine of every 10 cases of lung cancer, and also can cause cancer almost anywhere in your body. Preventing Cancer Across a Lifetime CDC scientists and other experts explored ways to lower cancer risk at different ages: early childhood, adolescence, early adulthood, midlife, and older adulthood.

Actived: 3 days ago

URL: https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/risk_factors.htm

How to Prevent Cancer or Find It Early CDC

Cancer is a term used for diseases in which abnormal cells divide without control and can invade other tissues. Cancer cells can spread to other parts of the body through the blood and lymph systems. Cancer is not just one disease, but many diseases.

Category:  Cancer Go Cancer

Cancer Data and Statistics CDC

The United States Cancer Statistics (USCS) are the official federal cancer statistics. They come from combined cancer registry data collected by CDC’s National Program of Cancer Registries and the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program. These data are used to understand cancer burden and

Category:  Cancer Go Cancer

An Update on Cancer Deaths in the United States CDC

Lung cancer was the leading cause of cancer death, accounting for 23% of all cancer deaths. Other common causes of cancer death were cancers of the colon and rectum (9%), pancreas (8%), female breast (7%), prostate (5%), and liver and intrahepatic bile duct (5%). Other cancers individually accounted for less than 5% of cancer deaths. In 2019—

Category:  Breast,  Colon and rectum,  Prostate Go Cancer

Cancer Research CDC

Cancer Research. CDC’s Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC) conducts and supports studies, often in collaboration with partners, to develop and apply sound science to reduce the burden of cancer and eliminate health disparities. This research uses many different areas of expertise (behavioral science, economics, epidemiology

Category:  Cancer Go Cancer

Cancer Data and Statistics Tools CDC

The U.S. Cancer Statistics Data Visualizations tool provides information on the numbers and rates of new cancer cases and deaths at the national, state, and county levels. You can see the numbers by sex, age, race and ethnicity, trends over time, survival, and prevalence. Text explains what is shown on each chart and graph.

Category:  Cancer Go Cancer

Cancer Survivor Stories CDC

More Ovarian Cancer Stories. Uterine Cancer. “Listen to your body—it does tell you things. It’s about knowing yourself. Once you know, you can fight it,’” says Lynn. More Uterine Cancer Stories. Vaginal and Vulvar Cancers. “Do not let fear, embarrassment, or shame prevent you from finding the help you need,” says Sarah.

Category:  Cancer Go Cancer

Cancer Videos CDC

Understanding Cancer Genetics and Testing. Developed by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, this video provides an introduction to the role of family history in cancer (cancer genetics, genetic counseling, and genetic testing). This video was supported by grant number 5 NU58DP006108-03-00 from the Centers for Disease

Category:  Cancer Go Cancer

U.S. Cancer Statistics Public Use Databases CDC

Cancer surveillance data from CDC and NCI are combined to become U.S. Cancer Statistics, the official source for federal cancer data. U.S. Cancer Statistics public use databases include cancer incidence and population data for all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico, providing information on more than 31 million cancer cases. .

Category:  Cancer Go Cancer

What Is Lung Cancer

Cancer is a disease in which cells in the body grow out of control. When cancer starts in the lungs, it is called lung cancer.. Lung cancer begins in the lungs and may spread to lymph nodes or other organs in the body, such as the brain.

Category:  Cancer Go Cancer

Staying Well During COVID-19 Cancer Survivors CDC

Cancer patients and survivors may have a higher risk of getting COVID-19 and other infections. They, and people who live with and take care of them, should take steps to protect their health. These tips can help cancer patients, as well as their family members and caregivers, stay healthy while staying home.

Category:  Care Go Cancer

Print Materials About Cancer CDC

CDC develops materials designed to teach health professionals, policy makers, the media, and the public about cancer prevention and control. They are available online as web pages, Adobe ® Acrobat ® PDF documents, or both. We offer a variety of fact sheets, brochures, posters, and more, including a selection in Spanish.

Category:  Cancer Go Cancer

Bladder Cancer CDC

Cancer is a disease in which cells in the body grow out of control. When cancer starts in the bladder, it is called bladder cancer. Each year in the United States, about 56,000 men and 17,500 women get bladder cancer, and about 12,000 men and 4,700 women die from the disease. To lower the risk of bladder cancer, don’t smoke and be especially

Category:  Cancer Go Cancer

What Is Breast Cancer

Breast cancer is a disease in which cells in the breast grow out of control. There are different kinds of breast cancer. The kind of breast cancer depends on which cells in the breast turn into cancer. Breast cancer can begin in different parts of the breast. A breast is made up of three main parts: lobules, ducts, and connective tissue.

Category:  Breast Go Cancer

Cancer Screening Tests CDC

Colorectal cancer almost always develops from precancerous polyps (abnormal growths) in the colon or rectum. Screening tests can find precancerous polyps, so they can be removed before they turn into cancer. Screening tests also can find colorectal cancer early, when treatment works best. Learn more about screening for colorectal cancer.

Category:  Cancer Go Cancer

Obesity and Cancer CDC

Breast cancer after menopause is the most common obesity-associated cancer among women. Colorectal cancer is the most common obesity-associated cancer among men. More than 90% of new obesity-related cancers occur in men and women who are 50 years old or older.

Category:  Breast Go Cancer

Ovarian Cancer CDC

Ovarian cancer causes more deaths each year than any other gynecologic cancer in the U.S. The Data Visualizations Tool provides detailed statistics. Inside Knowledge. CDC’s Inside Knowledge campaign raises awareness of the five main types of gynecologic cancer: cervical, ovarian, uterine, vaginal, and vulvar.

Category:  Cancer Go Cancer

Programs to Prevent and Control Cancer CDC

National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP) Provides funding, guidance, and technical assistance to help programs implement plans to prevent and control cancer. National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR) Supports central cancer registries to collect data on cancer occurrence, the type of initial treatment, and outcomes. Cancer

Category:  Cancer Go Cancer

Alcohol and Cancer CDC

The less alcohol you drink, the lower your risk for cancer. Drinking alcohol raises your risk of getting six kinds of cancer—. Mouth and throat. Voice box (larynx). Esophagus. Colon and rectum. Liver. Breast (in women). All types of alcoholic drinks, including red and white wine, beer, cocktails, and liquor, are linked with cancer.

Category:  Breast,  Colon and rectum Go Cancer

Tobacco and Cancer CDC

Smokeless tobacco products, such as dipping and chewing tobacco, can cause cancer, too, including cancers of the esophagus, mouth and throat, and pancreas. Smoking cigars causes lung cancer and increases the risk of cancers of the mouth, throat, larynx, and esophagus. Electronic cigarettes produce an aerosol by heating a liquid that usually contains nicotine—the addictive …

Category:  Cancer Go Cancer

About U.S. Cancer Statistics CDC

The United States Cancer Statistics are the official federal cancer statistics. These statistics include cancer registry data from CDC’s National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR) and the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program, external icon as well as mortality data from CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics.

Category:  Cancer Go Cancer

What Is Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal cancer is cancer that occurs in the colon or rectum. Sometimes it is called colon cancer, for short. As the drawing shows, the colon is the large intestine or large bowel. The rectum is the passageway that connects the colon to the anus. Sometimes abnormal growths, called polyps, form in the colon or rectum.

Category:  Cancer Go Cancer

Division of Cancer Prevention and Control At A Glance CDC

Division of Cancer Prevention and Control At A Glance. CDC’s Division of Cancer Prevention and Control is a leader in efforts to prevent and find cancers early and to improve the health of cancer survivors. The division works with other federal agencies to collect data on notifiable cancer cases in the United States and with national

Category:  Cancer Go Cancer

Cancer Initiatives CDC

The Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network (CPCRN) external icon is a national network of academic, public health, and community partners who work together to reduce the burden of cancer, especially among those disproportionately affected. Its members conduct community-based participatory cancer research across its eight network centers

Category:  Cancer Go Cancer

Cancer and Men Feature CDC

The link between smoking and cancer is well-known. But you may be surprised by other things that can lead to cancer. Ultraviolet (UV) rays from the sun or artificial sources like a tanning bed, booth, or sunlamp can cause skin cancer, the most common cancer.

Category:  Skin Go Cancer

Basic Information About Cervical Cancer CDC

Cancer is a disease in which cells in the body grow out of control. Cancer is always named for the part of the body where it starts, even if it spreads to other body parts later. When cancer starts in the cervix, it is called cervical cancer. The cervix connects the vagina (birth canal) to the upper part of the uterus.

Category:  Cancer Go Cancer

Cancer Continuing Medical Education (CME) Courses CDC

Colorectal Cancer Screening and Surveillance: Optimizing Quality. Expiration Date: March 24, 2022. This clinical anthology course has three related sections—. The Why, How, Who, and When of CRC Screening and Surveillance. Improving Stool …

Category:  Cancer Go Cancer

Cancer Incidence Projections in the United States Between

Between 2015 and 2050, we predict the overall age-standardized incidence rate (proxy for population risk for being diagnosed with cancer) to stabilize in women (1%) and decrease in men (−9%). Cancers with the largest change in risk include a 34% reduction for lung and bronchus and a 32% increase for corpus uterine (32%).

Category:  Cancer Go Cancer

What Are the Symptoms of Skin Cancer

A change in your skin is the most common sign of skin cancer. Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options Skip directly to A …

Category:  Skin Go Cancer

About the Databases U.S. Cancer Statistics Public Use

U.S. Cancer Statistics public use databases include cancer incidence and population data for all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico, providing information on more than 31 million cancer cases. The databases include data by demographic characteristics (for example, age, sex, and race) and tumor characteristics (for example

Category:  Cancer Go Cancer

Breast Cancer in Men CDC

The cancer cells begin in the ducts and then grow outside the ducts into other parts of the breast tissue. Invasive cancer cells can also spread, or metastasize, to other parts of the body. Invasive lobular carcinoma. Cancer cells begin in the lobules and then spread from the lobules to the breast tissues that are close by.

Category:  Breast Go Cancer

Indicator Definitions

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among cancers that affect both men and women. 2 In 2010, approximately 131,600 people were diagnosed with and 52,000 people died from the disease. 2 The incidence of colorectal cancer rises sharply after age 50 years. 2.

Category:  Cancer Go Cancer

Thyroid Cancer CDC

Cancer is a disease in which cells in the body grow out of control. When cancer starts in the thyroid gland, it is called thyroid cancer. Every year, about 12,000 men and 33,000 women get thyroid cancer, and about 900 men and 1,000 women die from the disease.

Category:  Cancer Go Cancer

Cáncer CDC

En pacientes de cáncer que están recibiendo quimioterapia. Consideraciones especiales para sobrevivientes y sus cuidadores. Los CDC realizan y apoyan investigaciones para reducir la carga del cáncer. Videos, podcasts, gráficas y materiales impresos. Resúmenes de nuestro trabajo y biografías de líderes y científicos.

Category:  Cancer Go Cancer

Cancer Prevention Works Newsletter CDC

Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men in the United States. September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, and this can help men understand their prostate health and the risk of prostate cancer. The risk for developing prostate cancer is higher for older men and for some men with a family history of prostate cancer.

Category:  Prostate Go Cancer

How to Access the Data U.S. Cancer Statistics Public Use

Complete and sign the U.S. Cancer Statistics Research Data Agreement. pdf icon [PDF-214KB]; E-mail the form to [email protected] Your request for access will be processed within 2 business days and you will receive a response notifying you when you have access to the databases in the SEER*Stat software.

Category:  Cancer Go Cancer

Healthy Living After Cancer CDC

Staying Active. Cancer survivors who keep a healthy weight and stay physically active may have a lower risk of having cancer come back. Start small and try to build up to 30 minutes of movement a day. bed solid icon. Sleeping Well. Many cancer survivors have trouble sleeping. Healthy sleep habits can help.

Category:  Cancer Go Cancer